Legendary mummy Tarim was buried in boat coffins in an barren desert made scientists confused

As part of the Silk Road and located at the geographical intersection of Eastern and Western cultures, the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has long served as a major crossroads for trans-Eurasian exchanges of people, cultures, agriculture, and languages.

Since the late 1990s, the discovery of hundreds of naturally mummified human remains dating to circa 2,000 BCE to 200 CE in the region’s Tarim Basin has attracted international attention due to their so-called ‘Western’ physical appearance, their felted and woven woolen clothing, and their agropastoral economy that included cattle, sheep and goat, wheat, barley, millet, and even kefir cheese. Buried in boat coffins in an otherwise barren desert, the Tarim Basin mummies have long puzzled scientists and inspired numerous theories as to their enigmatic origins.

To better understand the origin of the Tarim Basin mummies’ founding population, who first settled the region at sites such as Xiaohe and Gumugou circa 2,000 BCE, a team of international researchers from Jilin University, the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Seoul National University of Korea, and Harvard University generated and analyzed genome-wide data from thirteen of the earliest known Tarim Basin mummies, dating to circa 2,100 to 1,700 BCE, together with five individuals dating to circa 3,000 to 2,800 BCE in the neighboring Dzungarian Basin. This is the first genomic-scale study of prehistoric populations in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, and it includes the earliest yet discovered human remains from the region.

In contrast to the Tarim Basin, the earliest inhabitants of the neighboring Dzungarian Basin descended not only from local populations but also from Western steppe herders, namely the Afanasievo, a pastoralist group with strong genetic links to the Early Bronze Age Yamanya. The genetic characterization of the Early Bronze Age Dzungarians also helped to clarify the ancestry of other pastoralist groups known as the Chemurchek, who later spread northwards to the Altai mountains and into Mongolia. Chemurchek groups appear to be the descendants of Early Bronze Age Dzungarians and Central Asian groups the from Inner Asian Mountain Corridor (IAMC), who derive their ancestry from both local populations and BMAC agropastoralists.”These findings add to our understanding of the eastward dispersal of Yamnaya ancestry and the scenarios under which admixture occurred when they first met the populations of Inner Asia,” says Chao Ning, co-lead author the study and a professor of School of Archaeology and Museology at Peking University.

“Despite being genetically isolated, the Bronze Age peoples of the Tarim Basin were remarkably culturally cosmopolitan—they built their cuisine around wheat and dairy from the West Asia, millet from East Asia, and medicinal plants like Ephedra from Central Asia,” says Christina Warinner, a senior author of the study, a professor of Anthropology at Harvard University, and a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.

“Reconstructing the origins of the Tarim Basin mummies has had a transformative effect on our understanding of the region, and we will continue the study of ancient human genomes in other eras to gain a deeper understanding of the human migration history in the Eurasian steppes,” adds Yinquiu Cui, a senior author of the study and professor in the School of Life Sciences at Jilin University.

Related Posts

An expansive tomЬ in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings contains fifty mᴜmmіfіed remains, including infants and newborns.

CAIRO — Remаiпs of аƄoυt 50 mυmmіes, іпclυdіпg пew𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐧 ƄаƄies, thoυght to Ƅeloпg to the 18th Dyпаsty were foυпd іп а hυge tomƄ іп Egyрt’s Vаlley of…

As researchers look for foѕѕіɩѕ that may be used to date the 82 million-year-old sea moпѕteг, the “T-Rex of the ocean” emerges from the sands of time. 

Eighty two million years ago, the imposing mosasaur was roaming the high seas, devouring its ргeу in a single Ьіte with a maw filled with giant, razor-ѕһагр…

Leɡасу Unveiled: King Tutankhamun’s Timeless Secrets гeⱱeаɩed Through Artistry and Symbolism

King Tutankhamun, the boy king of ancient Egypt, continues to captivate the world with the treasures trove of artifacts and insights he left behind. Among the most…

Discovery of Goldsmith’s tomЬ, Dating Back 3,500 Years, ᴜпeагtһed in Luxor’s Ancient Civil Service Cemetery

Egypt has announced the discovery in the southern city of Luxor of a pharaonic tomЬ belonging to a royal goldsmith who lived more than 3,500 years ago…

DeЬаte around the passing of a well-known paleontologist: teггіЬɩe excavation іпсіdeпt results in colleagues rejecting the hypothesis of ancient microorganisms.

Colleagues of world famous paleontologist Mike Getty ѕһot dowп ѕрeсᴜɩаtіoп that the 50-year-old dіed from exposure to ancient bacteria in dinosaur foѕѕіɩѕ while he was working on an…

In southwest England, a 200,000-year-old mammoth cemetery was discovered.

The unveiling of an ancient mammoth cemetery in southwest England stands as a profound archaeological discovery, providing a mesmerizing glimpse into the prehistoric past that dates back…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *